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How much longer will it take to get my refund?

Asked by: Long 654 views YA Discussion

So I filed my 2012 return Jan 30th and for the longest it said still processing, this week I received a letter saying my preparer didn’t answer 2 of the questions on form 8867. I faxed the letter back with the questions answered. Does anyone know what the ballpark figure will be like or how much longer to wait? I don’t want to call everyday.

How others found here:

  • IRS requested more information and received how much longer
  • recieved a letter from irs saying my refund was reduced how long before i get the refund

2 Answers



  1. alan on Feb 22, 2013 Reply

    They could have messed your taxes up and had to look over some things it should only take 4 weeks or longer depending on the circumstances.

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  2. Jino on Feb 22, 2013 Reply

    So I filed my 2012 return Jan 30th and for the longest it said still processing, this week I received a letter saying my preparer didn’t answer 2 of the questions on form 8867. I faxed the letter back with the questions answered. Does anyone know what the ballpark figure will be like or how much longer to wait? I don’t want to call everyday======> February 17, 2013 – IRS Delaying Refunds for Some EITC Taxpayers
    Last week, the IRS reported that a large number of tax returns containing Form 8867 (Paid Preparers Earned Income Credit Checklist) were submitted with “incomplete” information, particularly during the first week of the filing season. There appears to have been confusion in the opening days of the season as to the exact requirements of this form and of the IRS. This caused confusion for the tax software companies and EROs.

    In the last few days, the IRS has apparently now begun sending letters to taxpayers in cases where the Form 8867 was not completed to the satisfaction of the IRS. In these letters, the IRS notes that some of the required entries on lines of Form 8867 were missing. What is confusing for the taxpayer is that these lines are supposed to be completed by the tax preparer (not the taxpayer). For example, line 24 is a question to the preparer that asks the preparer “Did you ask this taxpayer any additional questions that are necessary to meet your knowledge requirement?” The letters from the IRS instruct the taxpayer to provide answers to certain questions on Form 8867. The letters go on to tell the taxpayer that if they do not respond to the letter, their refund may be reduced. And, if they do respond, their refund will be issued in about 6 to 8 weeks from the time the taxpayer provides “responses” to the requested lines on Form 8867. The IRS allows taxpayers to provide responses by fax or by mail.

    Blog posts at various web sites reveal that this problem has affected many preparers nationwide. In these posts, preparers appear frustrated that the IRS has delayed these refunds and sent letters to their taxpayers that seemingly serve to confuse the taxpayers. In most cases, taxpayers receiving the IRS letter mentioned above will have their entire refund temporarily held by the IRS. But in other cases, the IRS may pay the non-EITC portion of the refund, and have delayed only the EITC portion of the refund. If the taxpayer receives only a portion of their refund, and you determine that the IRS has shorted the taxpayer by the exact amount of the EITC, you can feel certain that the IRS will be mailing the taxpayer a letter requesting more information.

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