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7 Answers

Can i use my medical bills as a tax write off?

Asked by: lpliskin 887 views YA Discussion

Had a baby earlier this year and need to know if I can use my medical expenses as a tax write off? My husband is the only income since I’m a stay at home mom. I was told your medical expenses had to be more than 10% of your income is this true or false? Where can I get more legitimate information about taxes? Thanks for your help and time.

How others found here:

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7 Answers



  1. Landlord on Nov 30, 2012 Reply

    You have to itemize, and the cut off is 7.5%. You write off the amount that exceeds the 7.5% of your joint income with your husband.

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  2. Pascal the Gambler on Nov 30, 2012 Reply

    IF you itemize, you may deduct the portion above 7.5% of your AGI for items you physcially paid in 2012. You have to actually have paid them, not just incurred them.

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  3. Herrmann on Nov 30, 2012 Reply

    ” and the cut off is 7.5%”

    No, the “floor” is 7.5%. This means you have to exceed 7.5% of your AGI to reap any benefits from listing your medical expenses on your Schedule A – Itemized Deductions. The amount up to 7.5% of your AGI is non-deductible.

    As you should know, you either get to take the standard deduction (2 x 5950 or 11,900 for Married/Joint) or you can Itemize. So, unless your Medical, State Income or Sales Taxes, Real Estate Taxes, Mortgage Interest, etc (items you can deduct on Schedule A) exceeds $ 11,900 (for Married/Joint) you shouldn’t bother to Itemize.

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  4. Bobbie on Nov 30, 2012 Reply

    Married filing joint 2012 tax year your standard deduction would be 11900 during the 2013 tax filing season for a start. Using the schedule A itemized deduction amount will have to MORE than the 11900 amount before any of those amounts would even start to reduce your AGI down for your TAXABLE income amount for this purpose.
    Using only the unreimbursed medical expense that you PAID during the tax year 2012 only the amount that would be MORE than 71/2% of your AGI amount from your 1040 income tax return line 37 and 38 would be used on the schedule A for your medical expense deduction to start with in order to get MORE than the 11900 standard deduction amount at the bottom of the schedule A when you get to your TOTAL itemized deduction amount during the 2013 tax filing season.
    You should itemize deductions if your total deductions are more than the standard deduction amount.
    Topic 501 Should I Itemize

    http://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc501.html

    Generally, you must decide whether to itemize deductions or to use the standard deduction. The standard deduction is a dollar amount that reduces the amount of income on which you are taxed. You should itemize deductions if your allowable itemized deductions are greater than your standard deduction. Some taxpayers must itemize deductions because they cannot use the standard deduction.
    You cannot use the standard deduction if:
    •You are married and filing a separate return, and your spouse itemizes deductions
    •You are a nonresident alien or a dual-status alien during the year, or
    •You are filing a tax return for a period of less than 12 months because of a change in your annual accounting method
    In addition an estate or trust, common trust fund, or partnership cannot use the standard deduction. For additional information, refer to Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information.
    You may benefit from itemizing your deductions on Schedule A if you:
    •Cannot use the standard deduction
    •Had large uninsured medical and dental expenses
    •Paid interest or taxes on your home
    •Had large unreimbursed employee business expenses
    •Had large uninsured casualty or theft losses, or
    •Made large charitable contributions
    You may be subject to limitations on some of your itemized deductions. Please refer to the Form 1040 Instructions or Form 1040, Schedule A Instructions for the limitation amounts.Note: For 2011, taxpayers with adjusted gross income above a certain amount will no longer lose part of their itemized deductions.
    For more information on the difference between itemized deductions and the standard deduction, refer to the Form 1040 Instructions, or Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax. You may also refer to Topic 551 and Publication 501.
    Use the search box at the http://www.irs.gov website for Topic 500 – Itemized Deductions

    http://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc500.html

    The following topics are found in the category of Itemized Deductions. Each topic is followed by a corresponding number. To access your topic, select the three-digit number.
    Hope that you find the above enclosed information useful. 11/30/2012

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  5. Quick Answers on Nov 30, 2012 Reply

    The reason you heard 10% is that is the change in place for 2013.

    However, the 7.5% rule is still in play. Take you out of pocket expenses and deduct 7.5% of your husband’s AGI. Then is the remaining number more than $ 11900? That is already the standard deduction for an MFJ return. Unless you have other items for schedule A…

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  6. tro on Dec 01, 2012 Reply

    you personally do not write them off, you as a joint taxpayer with your husband may claim medical expenses on Sch A if they exceed 7.5% of the AGI on the 1040
    if the medical is all you can claim on Sch A you very likely will not be able to claim them
    your standard deduction for married jointly is $ 11900 and to use the sch A you would have to be able itemize greater than that

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  7. Judy on Dec 01, 2012 Reply

    Unreimbursed medical expenses can be a tax deduction, but only the amount over 7.5% (this year yet – going to 10% for future years) of your joint AGI if you file joint which you should, and only if you itemize. Odds are high this means no you can’t, unless you Already itemize the med expenses aren’t likely to be enough.

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